#SixForSunday · 2019 · tags

#SixForSunday – 1st September- Books I think should be studied at school

This Sunday tag is created and run by Steph over at A Little But A Lot. There are some very interesting and fun prompts coming up this autumn so check it out. Today’s topic is Book I think should be studies at school. Which is a very interesting topic and I could have an endless list but I’ve ended up with a selection of fiction and non-fiction books for this. I’ve based this list on what I think would have benefited me when I was in school.

Let’s dive into the list of my 6 Books I think should be studies at school, 3 non-fiction books and 3 fiction books to create some debates and insight to different people.


Non-Fiction Books


Why I No Longer Talk To White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

This is a very important book which highlights how annoying white people can be. It talks a lot about privilege and could become a very intense and interesting discussion about how to recognise privileged, unconscious bias, etc. Though It could also get quite intense.

Synopsis for Why I No Longer Talk To White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren’t affected by it. She posted a piece on her blog, entitled: ‘Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race’ that led to this book.

Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. It is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today.


It’s Not About The Burqa edt by Miriam Khan

Again a very interesting discussion book about Islam and feminism. It would be very interesting to read at school and get an insight that a group of white kids might not already have and could eliminate prejudice.

GoodReads Synopsis:

When was the last time you heard a Muslim woman speak for herself without a filter? 

In 2016, Mariam Khan read that David Cameron had linked the radicalization of Muslim men to the ‘traditional submissiveness’ of Muslim women. Mariam felt pretty sure she didn’t know a single Muslim woman who would describe herself that way. Why was she hearing about Muslim women from people who were neither Muslim, nor female?
Years later the state of the national discourse has deteriorated even further, and Muslim women’s voices are still pushed to the fringes – the figures leading the discussion are white and male.

Taking one of the most politicized and misused words associated with Muslim women and Islamophobia, It’s Not About the Burqa is poised to change all that. Here are voices you won’t see represented in the national news headlines: seventeen Muslim women speaking frankly about the hijab and wavering faith, about love and divorce, about feminism, queer identity, sex, and the twin threats of a disapproving community and a racist country. Funny, warm, sometimes sad, and often angry, each of these essays is a passionate declaration, and each essay is calling time on the oppression, the lazy stereotyping, the misogyny and the Islamophobia.

What does it mean, exactly, to be a Muslim woman in the West today? According to the media, it’s all about the burqa.

Here’s what it’s really about.


Fight Like A Girl by Clementine Ford

A feminist manifesto which again would cause some serious discussion about gender and equality and equal rights. This book could open a persons mind to what unconscious bias they might have.

GoodReads synopsis:

Personal and fearless – a call to arms for feminists new, old and as yet unrealised by one of our most outspoken feminist writers.

‘With wit, insight and glorious, righteous rage, Clementine Ford lays out all the ways in which girls and women are hurt and held back, and unapologetically demands that the world do better. A passionate and urgently needed call to arms, Fight Like A Girl insists on our right to be angry, to be heard and to fight. It’ll change lives.’ Emily Maguire, author of An Isolated Incident

A friend recently told me that the things I write are powerful for her because they have the effect of making her feel angry instead of just empty. I want to do this for all women and young girls – to take the emptiness and numbness they feel about being a girl in this world and turn it into rage and power. I want to teach all of them how to FIGHT LIKE A GIRL. Clementine Ford

Online sensation, fearless feminist heroine and scourge of trolls and misogynists everywhere, Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat.

Fight Like A Girl will make you laugh, cry and scream. But above all it will make you demand and fight for a world in which women have real equality and not merely the illusion of it.


Fiction Books


The Five People You Meet In Heaven by Mitch Albom

In interesting book (and quite short) about why you are in certain places in life. In this book The main characters life is explained to him and tells of his importance to others even though he didn’t think so highly of his own life.

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GoodReads Synopsis:

From the author of the phenomenal #1 New York Times bestseller Tuesdays with Morrie, a novel that explores the unexpected connections of our lives, and the idea that heaven is more than a place; it’s an answer. 

Eddie is a wounded war veteran, an old man who has lived, in his mind, an uninspired life. His job is fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. On his 83rd birthday, a tragic accident kills him as he tries to save a little girl from a falling cart. He awakes in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a destination. It’s a place where your life is explained to you by five people, some of whom you knew, others who may have been strangers. One by one, from childhood to soldier to old age, Eddie’s five people revisit their connections to him on earth, illuminating the mysteries of his “meaningless” life, and revealing the haunting secret behind the eternal question: “Why was I here?”


Fierce Femmes and Notorious Liars by Kai Chen Thom

A con fabulous trans girl memoir which could create an interesting debate about trans rights etc.

GoodRead synopsis:

Fierce Femmes and Notorious Liars: A Dangerous Trans Girl’s Confabulous Memoir by Kai Cheng Thom is the highly sensational, ultra-exciting, sort-of true coming-of-age story of a young Asian trans girl, pathological liar, and kung-fu expert who runs away from her parents’ abusive home in a rainy city called Gloom. Striking off on her own, she finds her true family in a group of larger-than-life trans femmes who live in a mysterious pleasure district known only as the Street of Miracles. Under the wings of this fierce and fabulous flock, Dearly blossoms into the woman she has always dreamed of being, with a little help from the unscrupulous Doctor Crocodile. When one of their number is brutally murdered, the protagonist joins her sisters in forming a vigilante gang to fight back against the transphobes, violent johns, and cops that stalk the Street of Miracles. But when things go terribly wrong, she must find the truth within herself in order to stop the violence and discover what it really means to grow up and find your family.


The Power by Naomi Alderman

This is a very powerful book and an interesting view into a world where the gender roles change.

GoodReads synopsis:

In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who lounges around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.


What do you think?

Let me know!

3 thoughts on “#SixForSunday – 1st September- Books I think should be studied at school

  1. I’ve read The Five People You Meet in Heaven and The Power, and I agree that both would be great to teach in schools. They both hit the themes of valuing yourself and analyzing how you treat others.

    Liked by 1 person

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