2018

GoodReads Monday – 20th July 2020

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme hosted by Lauren’s Page Turners. To participate, choose a random book from your TBR and show it off! Don’t forget to link back to the creator of the meme, Lauren.

Happy Monday everyone! I though I’d start the week off by highlighting a book on my GoodReads TBR. I currently have 828 book on my Want-To-Read list which I know is endless. However, I feel if I start looking at it regularly I might end up cleaning it up while I scroll through looking for that one book to highlight. So here to a clean-up side affect 😉

This week I dug out Don’t Touch My Hair by Emma Dabiri. Originally published last year so a fairly recent book. I think its been on my shelf since it came out. I hate it when people touch my straight soft hair and I know about the desire of touching bubbly afros as the texture is so different from my own, BUT I know it’s wrong so I don’t do it. Reading this book will (I hope) give me the insight to black hair. Also an understanding for how black hair works and how to style it and the history behind it. Maybe I’ll even get and insight to weaves, which I never knew anything about before I watched Queer Eye.

From Guardian contributor BBC race correspondent Emma Dabiri comes an essay collection exploring the ways in which black hair has been appropriated and stigmatized throughout history, with ruminations on body politics, race, pop culture, and Dabiri’s own journey to loving her hair.

Emma Dabiri can tell you the first time she chemically straightened her hair. She can describe the smell, the atmosphere of the salon, and her mix of emotions when she saw her normally kinky tresses fall down her shoulders. For as long as Emma can remember, her hair has been a source of insecurity, shame, and—from strangers and family alike—discrimination. And she is not alone.

Despite increasingly liberal world views, black hair continues to be erased, appropriated, and stigmatized to the point of taboo. Through her personal and historical journey, Dabiri gleans insights into the way racism is coded in society’s perception of black hair—and how it is often used as an avenue for discrimination. Dabiri takes us from pre-colonial Africa, through the Harlem Renaissance, and into today’s Natural Hair Movement, exploring everything from women’s solidarity and friendship, to the criminalization of dreadlocks, to the dubious provenance of Kim Kardashian’s braids.

Through the lens of hair texture, Dabiri leads us on a historical and cultural investigation of the global history of racism—and her own personal journey of self-love and finally, acceptance.

Have you read this? What did you think?

Until next time.

2 thoughts on “GoodReads Monday – 20th July 2020

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