#SixForSunday · 2019 · tags

#SixForSunday – 27th September 2020 – Devious Main Characters

This Sunday tag is created and run by Steph over at A Little But A Lot. There are some very interesting and fun prompts coming up this autumn so check it out. Today’s topic is devious main characters.

I had to look up this word just to make sure I understood it right. Its not always easy to be foreign 🙂 but I’m always learning. Devious, as I’ve understood it, means someone who isn’t always true and honest but get their way. They don’t have to be cruel or evil or bad, but they will lie to get their way. They are usually clever and intelligent and patience.

These are probably my favourite character, the devious ones. Choosing only 6 for my list was difficult and some had to be sacrificed…

Let’s dive into the list of my 6 Devious Main Characters (mostly).

Locke Lamora from The Lies of Locke Lamora (#1) by Scott Lynch

How can I have a post about devious character and not include Locke Lamora? It’s in the title! He lies! He lies so much its in the tile of the book! So obviously he made my list 🙂 haha!

Synopsis:

They say that the Thorn of Camorr can beat anyone in a fight. They say he steals from the rich and gives to the poor. They say he’s part man, part myth, and mostly street-corner rumor. And they are wrong on every count.

Only averagely tall, slender, and god-awful with a sword, Locke Lamora is the fabled Thorn, and the greatest weapons at his disposal are his wit and cunning. He steals from the rich – they’re the only ones worth stealing from – but the poor can go steal for themselves. What Locke cons, wheedles and tricks into his possession is strictly for him and his band of fellow con-artists and thieves: the Gentleman Bastards.

Together their domain is the city of Camorr. Built of Elderglass by a race no-one remembers, it’s a city of shifting revels, filthy canals, baroque palaces and crowded cemeteries. Home to Dons, merchants, soldiers, beggars, cripples, and feral children. And to Capa Barsavi, the criminal mastermind who runs the city.

But there are whispers of a challenge to the Capa’s power. A challenge from a man no one has ever seen, a man no blade can touch. The Grey King is coming.

A man would be well advised not to be caught between Capa Barsavi and The Grey King. Even such a master of the sword as the Thorn of Camorr. As for Locke Lamora …

AIDAN from Illuminae Files (#1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff

Wow! Aidan! What to say about this character. Aidan is one of many main characters throughout the Illuminae Files Series, and as for an artificial intelligence they are pretty devious. Aidan will lie to get their way and do what needed for the “greater good”. That I realise was a slight spoiler of the first book but its old enough to allow it, I think. Sorry if not 🙂

But then Kady Grant is quite devious as well in this series, maybe not so much the first book but later on.

Synopsis:

This morning, Kady thought breaking up with Ezra was the hardest thing she’d have to do. This afternoon, her planet was invaded.

The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than a speck at the edge of the universe. Now with enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to evacuate with a hostile warship in hot pursuit.

But their problems are just getting started. A plague has broken out and is mutating with terrifying results; the fleet’s AI may actually be their enemy; and nobody in charge will say what’s really going on. As Kady hacks into a web of data to find the truth, it’s clear the only person who can help her is the ex-boyfriend she swore she’d never speak to again.

Told through a fascinating dossier of hacked documents—including emails, maps, files, IMs, medical reports, interviews, and more—Illuminae is the first book in a heart-stopping trilogy about lives interrupted, the price of truth, and the courage of everyday heroes. 

Jude for the Folk of Air Series by Holly Black

Jude is not really devious by nature. She is taught to be devious due to necessity more than anything. She becomes more and more devious as the series goes along and it’s lush!

Synopsis:

Of course I want to be like them. They’re beautiful as blades forged in some divine fire. They will live forever.

And Cardan is even more beautiful than the rest. I hate him more than all the others. I hate him so much that sometimes when I look at him, I can hardly breathe.

Jude was seven when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King.

To win a place at the Court, she must defy him–and face the consequences.

As Jude becomes more deeply embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, she discovers her own capacity for trickery and bloodshed. But as betrayal threatens to drown the Courts of Faerie in violence, Jude will need to risk her life in a dangerous alliance to save her sisters, and Faerie itself.

Dalia from A Darker Shade of Magic (#1) by V. E. Schwab

Dahlia is not so much a main character in the first book as she is in the other two. And yes she is deliciously devious! The stuff she does to get her way is amazing.

She is my favourite character in the entire series.

Synopsis:

Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black.

Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see.

Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand.

After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure.

Now perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, they’ll first need to stay alive.

Nahri from City of Brass (#1) by S. A. Chakraborty

Nahri as a cont-women is already devious from page 1 of this book, and her deviousness continues throughout the entire series. However, it decreases towards the end.

This is an amazing trilogy and highly recommended if you haven’t already read it.

Synopsis:

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles.

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass, a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for…

Laila from The Gilded Wolves (#1) by Roshani Chokshi

This is slightly cheating as Laila is not a main character. She is the next levels down. But! I think she deserves her place on my list of devious characters based on the ending of this book. Such a sly move! You clever woman! I won’t spoil it but I loved what she did and I desperately want the next book to read about the outcome!

Synopsis:

It’s 1889. The city is on the cusp of industry and power, and the Exposition Universelle has breathed new life into the streets and dredged up ancient secrets. Here, no one keeps tabs on dark truths better than treasure-hunter and wealthy hotelier Séverin Montagnet-Alarie. When the elite, ever-powerful Order of Babel coerces him to help them on a mission, Séverin is offered a treasure that he never imagined: his true inheritance.

To hunt down the ancient artifact the Order seeks, Séverin calls upon a band of unlikely experts: An engineer with a debt to pay. A historian banished from his home. A dancer with a sinister past. And a brother in arms if not blood.

Together, they will join Séverin as he explores the dark, glittering heart of Paris. What they find might change the course of history–but only if they can stay alive.

What do you think?

Let me know!

4 thoughts on “#SixForSunday – 27th September 2020 – Devious Main Characters

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