#SixForSunday · 2019 · tags

#SixForSunday – 8th November – Children’s books that would make brilliant graphic novels

This Sunday tag is created and run by Steph over at A Little But A Lot. There are some very interesting and fun prompts coming up this autumn so check it out. Today’s topic is children’s books that would make brilliant graphic novels. I will include Middle Grade novels in here as well but not YA.

Let’s dive into the list of my 6 Children’s books that would make brilliant graphic novels

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter To The World by Ashley Herring Blake

The main character Ivy, has an artistic side and often drscribe her drawing in the book, but I woul dhave loved thi as a graphic novel just to see all the colours she uses.

Synopsis:

When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen’s house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm–and what’s worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.

Mysteriously, Ivy’s drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks–and hopes–that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings?

Eren by Simon P. Clark

There is something about monsters which does well in graphic novels. Eren is (as far as I remember) fairly moody.

Synopsis:

People are keeping secrets from Oli – about where his father is, and why he hasn’t come to join them at his uncle’s house in the country.

But Oli has secrets too.

He knows what lives in the attic. Eren – part monster, part dream, part myth. Eren who always seems so interested, who always wants to hear more about Oli’s life. Eren, who needs to hear stories to live, and will take them from Oli, no matter the cost.

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

Maybe because I have recently read the second book but I feel this would be amazing in graphic novel version. There is something about magical things that is just better visually.

Synopsis:

Sunny Nwazue lives in Nigeria, but she was born in New York City. Her features are West African, but she’s albino. She’s a terrific athlete, but can’t go out into the sun to play soccer. There seems to be no place where she fits in. And then she discovers something amazing—she is a “free agent” with latent magical power. And she has a lot of catching up to do.

Soon she’s part of a quartet of magic students, studying the visible and invisible, learning to change reality. But just as she’s finding her footing, Sunny and her friends are asked by the magical authorities to help track down a career criminal who knows magic, too. Will their training be enough to help them against a threat whose powers greatly outnumber theirs?

Keys To The Kingdom series by Garth Nix

This is a series of 7 book which all takes place within a house that has sever levels and our main character has to climb it. Every level is controlled by a different person who represent the days of the week and also decides what that floor looks like. My most memorable book of this series is Wednesday which is a water filled level. This whole series would be amazing in graphic novel format with all the different worlds and levels.

Synopsis:

Arthur Penhaligon’s first days at his new school don’t go too well, particularly when a fiendish Mister Monday appears, gives Arthur a magical clock hand, and then orders his gang of dog-faced goons to chase Arthur around and get it back. But when the confused and curious boy discovers that a mysterious virus is spreading through town, he decides to enter an otherworldly house to stop it. After meeting Suzy Blue and the first part of “the Will” (a frog-looking entity that knows everything about the House), Arthur learns that he’s been selected as Rightful Heir to the House and must get the other part of the clock hand in order to defeat Monday. That means getting past Monday’s henchmen and journeying to the Dayroom itself. Thankfully, Arthur is up to the challenge, but as he finds out, his fight seems to be only one-seventh over.

With a weapon-wielding hero and a villain who doesn’t make Mondays any nicer, Nix’s Keys to the Kingdom launch is imaginative and gripping. After an action-packed crescendo to the book’s middle — when Arthur finally learns his destiny — Nix keeps the drama going and doesn’t let it fall. By the end, you might be winded from all the fantastic explanation, but you’ll definitely be salivating for what’s to come. 

The Snow Spider Trilogy by Jenny Nimmo

I read this as I was learning English and loved it. I vividly remember the different objects in the story but not what the story was about. I do remember it being exiting and filled with snow. I can only imagine it in graphic novel version.

Synopsis:

On Gwyn’s 9th birthday, his grandmother tells him he may be a magician, like his Welsh ancestors. She gives him five gifts to help him–a brooch, a piece of dried seaweed, a tin whistle, a scarf, and a broken toy horse. One blustery day, unsure what to do with his newfound magic, Gwyn throws the brooch to the wind and receives a silvery snow spider in return. Will he be able to use this special spider to bring his missing sister, Bethan, home? THE SNOW SPIDER spins an icy, sparkly web of mystical intrigue that sets the stage for the next two books in this outstanding trilogy! 

The Neverending Stroy by Michael Ende

Who has not read this an weeped? or watched the movie and cried your eyes out when the horse get stuck in the quicksand… That is the most memorable part of this story. I can imagine this would be amazing as a graphic novel.

Synopsis:

This epic work of the imagination has captured the hearts of millions of readers worldwide since it was first published more than a decade ago. Its special story within a story is an irresistible invitation for readers to become part of the book itself. And now this modern classic and bibliophile’s dream is available in hardcover again.

The story begins with a lonely boy named Bastian and the strange book that draws him into the beautiful but doomed world of Fantastica. Only a human can save this enchanted place by giving its ruler, the Childlike Empress, a new name. But the journey to her tower leads through lands of dragons, giants, monsters, and magic and once Bastian begins his quest, he may never return. As he is drawn deeper into Fantastica, he must find the courage to face unspeakable foes and the mysteries of his own heart.

What do you think?

Let me know!

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